Gina Gershon and Jennifer Tilly in publicity still for Bound (Wachowski Brothers, 1996)
"It is, perhaps, to be expected that the notorious invisibility of lesbianism would leave its mark on the cinematic style of a film whose plot development plays on the impossibility of lesbian legibility. Less predictable, however, is the way the Wachowski brothers’ sexual thriller, Bound (1996), is everywhere structured by its attempts to visualize lesbianism, to make it succumb, once and for all, to the order of the visible. While the elusiveness of homosexuality is crucial to the film’s narrative, Bound simultaneously requires lesbianism to function evidentially, to disclose itself within visual field. Under this representational double bind, the film frequently compensates for the indeterminacy of sexuality with cinematic technique. In the enigmatic opening sequence, for instance, Corky (Gina Gershon) - shortly identified as an ex-con, good with her hands - lies unconscious, bound and gagged at the bottom of a closet, the tight dimensions of which the mobile camera had distorted with its wide-angle focus and first vertical, then horizontal, trajectory so that the place of confinement is oddly capacious, holding as it does not just a limp body but the fetishized accessories that could be said to constitute both her character and that of her accomplice, Violet (Jennifer Tilly). Like many things in Bound, this scene invites a parallel with Alfred Hitchock’s Rope (1948). It would seem that the Wachowskis are deploying Hitchcock’s famous moving camera in the one place he never allowed it: the closed space which holds the body. Towards the end of Rope’s dinner party, when Jimmy Stewart finally lifts the lid of the chest that hides the strangled victim, the camera-shot continues to conceal that much anticipated sight offscreen. The circumstances of Hitchcock’s framing, according to D.A. Miller, has little to do with the conventions of a murder plot and everything to do with ‘pathways of symbolic signification’ that inevitably return to the sexual status of the young man’s asphyxiated body. Miller goes on to argue that the ‘obscenity’ of the aroused male body ‘“murdered” from behind’, and its implications for a heterosexual visual economy mortgaged to castration anxiety, require that the young man’s body remain hidden for the duration of Hitchcock’s film. However, the still-breathing body discovered inside Bound's most recessed space, far from remaining unseen, is repeatedly submitted to the trial of visibility. Not once, but three times Bound revisits the spectacle of the unrestrained figure held in the dark; and that female body’s vulnerability to the camera’s investigative eye returns us, as unfailingly as Hitchock’s visual reticenc, to a consideration of its homsexual status.”
— Lee Wallace, ‘Continuous sex: the editing of homosexuality in Bound and Rope’, in Screen, vol 41, no1, Winter 2000

Gina Gershon and Jennifer Tilly in publicity still for Bound (Wachowski Brothers, 1996)

"It is, perhaps, to be expected that the notorious invisibility of lesbianism would leave its mark on the cinematic style of a film whose plot development plays on the impossibility of lesbian legibility. Less predictable, however, is the way the Wachowski brothers’ sexual thriller, Bound (1996), is everywhere structured by its attempts to visualize lesbianism, to make it succumb, once and for all, to the order of the visible. While the elusiveness of homosexuality is crucial to the film’s narrative, Bound simultaneously requires lesbianism to function evidentially, to disclose itself within visual field. Under this representational double bind, the film frequently compensates for the indeterminacy of sexuality with cinematic technique. In the enigmatic opening sequence, for instance, Corky (Gina Gershon) - shortly identified as an ex-con, good with her hands - lies unconscious, bound and gagged at the bottom of a closet, the tight dimensions of which the mobile camera had distorted with its wide-angle focus and first vertical, then horizontal, trajectory so that the place of confinement is oddly capacious, holding as it does not just a limp body but the fetishized accessories that could be said to constitute both her character and that of her accomplice, Violet (Jennifer Tilly). Like many things in Bound, this scene invites a parallel with Alfred Hitchock’s Rope (1948). It would seem that the Wachowskis are deploying Hitchcock’s famous moving camera in the one place he never allowed it: the closed space which holds the body. Towards the end of Rope’s dinner party, when Jimmy Stewart finally lifts the lid of the chest that hides the strangled victim, the camera-shot continues to conceal that much anticipated sight offscreen. The circumstances of Hitchcock’s framing, according to D.A. Miller, has little to do with the conventions of a murder plot and everything to do with ‘pathways of symbolic signification’ that inevitably return to the sexual status of the young man’s asphyxiated body. Miller goes on to argue that the ‘obscenity’ of the aroused male body ‘“murdered” from behind’, and its implications for a heterosexual visual economy mortgaged to castration anxiety, require that the young man’s body remain hidden for the duration of Hitchcock’s film. However, the still-breathing body discovered inside Bound's most recessed space, far from remaining unseen, is repeatedly submitted to the trial of visibility. Not once, but three times Bound revisits the spectacle of the unrestrained figure held in the dark; and that female body’s vulnerability to the camera’s investigative eye returns us, as unfailingly as Hitchock’s visual reticenc, to a consideration of its homsexual status.”

— Lee Wallace, ‘Continuous sex: the editing of homosexuality in Bound and Rope’, in Screen, vol 41, no1, Winter 2000

Gina Gershon and Jennifer Tilly in publicity still for Bound (Wachowski Brothers, 1996)
"It is, perhaps, to be expected that the notorious invisibility of lesbianism would leave its mark on the cinematic style of a film whose plot development plays on the impossibility of lesbian legibility. Less predictable, however, is the way the Wachowski brothers’ sexual thriller, Bound (1996), is everywhere structured by its attempts to visualize lesbianism, to make it succumb, once and for all, to the order of the visible. While the elusiveness of homosexuality is crucial to the film’s narrative, Bound simultaneously requires lesbianism to function evidentially, to disclose itself within visual field. Under this representational double bind, the film frequently compensates for the indeterminacy of sexuality with cinematic technique. In the enigmatic opening sequence, for instance, Corky (Gina Gershon) - shortly identified as an ex-con, good with her hands - lies unconscious, bound and gagged at the bottom of a closet, the tight dimensions of which the mobile camera had distorted with its wide-angle focus and first vertical, then horizontal, trajectory so that the place of confinement is oddly capacious, holding as it does not just a limp body but the fetishized accessories that could be said to constitute both her character and that of her accomplice, Violet (Jennifer Tilly). Like many things in Bound, this scene invites a parallel with Alfred Hitchock’s Rope (1948). It would seem that the Wachowskis are deploying Hitchcock’s famous moving camera in the one place he never allowed it: the closed space which holds the body. Towards the end of Rope’s dinner party, when Jimmy Stewart finally lifts the lid of the chest that hides the strangled victim, the camera-shot continues to conceal that much anticipated sight offscreen. The circumstances of Hitchcock’s framing, according to D.A. Miller, has little to do with the conventions of a murder plot and everything to do with ‘pathways of symbolic signification’ that inevitably return to the sexual status of the young man’s asphyxiated body. Miller goes on to argue that the ‘obscenity’ of the aroused male body ‘“murdered” from behind’, and its implications for a heterosexual visual economy mortgaged to castration anxiety, require that the young man’s body remain hidden for the duration of Hitchcock’s film. However, the still-breathing body discovered inside Bound's most recessed space, far from remaining unseen, is repeatedly submitted to the trial of visibility. Not once, but three times Bound revisits the spectacle of the unrestrained figure held in the dark; and that female body’s vulnerability to the camera’s investigative eye returns us, as unfailingly as Hitchock’s visual reticenc, to a consideration of its homsexual status.”
— Lee Wallace, ‘Continuous sex: the editing of homosexuality in Bound and Rope’, in Screen, vol 41, no1, Winter 2000

Gina Gershon and Jennifer Tilly in publicity still for Bound (Wachowski Brothers, 1996)

"It is, perhaps, to be expected that the notorious invisibility of lesbianism would leave its mark on the cinematic style of a film whose plot development plays on the impossibility of lesbian legibility. Less predictable, however, is the way the Wachowski brothers’ sexual thriller, Bound (1996), is everywhere structured by its attempts to visualize lesbianism, to make it succumb, once and for all, to the order of the visible. While the elusiveness of homosexuality is crucial to the film’s narrative, Bound simultaneously requires lesbianism to function evidentially, to disclose itself within visual field. Under this representational double bind, the film frequently compensates for the indeterminacy of sexuality with cinematic technique. In the enigmatic opening sequence, for instance, Corky (Gina Gershon) - shortly identified as an ex-con, good with her hands - lies unconscious, bound and gagged at the bottom of a closet, the tight dimensions of which the mobile camera had distorted with its wide-angle focus and first vertical, then horizontal, trajectory so that the place of confinement is oddly capacious, holding as it does not just a limp body but the fetishized accessories that could be said to constitute both her character and that of her accomplice, Violet (Jennifer Tilly). Like many things in Bound, this scene invites a parallel with Alfred Hitchock’s Rope (1948). It would seem that the Wachowskis are deploying Hitchcock’s famous moving camera in the one place he never allowed it: the closed space which holds the body. Towards the end of Rope’s dinner party, when Jimmy Stewart finally lifts the lid of the chest that hides the strangled victim, the camera-shot continues to conceal that much anticipated sight offscreen. The circumstances of Hitchcock’s framing, according to D.A. Miller, has little to do with the conventions of a murder plot and everything to do with ‘pathways of symbolic signification’ that inevitably return to the sexual status of the young man’s asphyxiated body. Miller goes on to argue that the ‘obscenity’ of the aroused male body ‘“murdered” from behind’, and its implications for a heterosexual visual economy mortgaged to castration anxiety, require that the young man’s body remain hidden for the duration of Hitchcock’s film. However, the still-breathing body discovered inside Bound's most recessed space, far from remaining unseen, is repeatedly submitted to the trial of visibility. Not once, but three times Bound revisits the spectacle of the unrestrained figure held in the dark; and that female body’s vulnerability to the camera’s investigative eye returns us, as unfailingly as Hitchock’s visual reticenc, to a consideration of its homsexual status.”

— Lee Wallace, ‘Continuous sex: the editing of homosexuality in Bound and Rope’, in Screen, vol 41, no1, Winter 2000

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foxesinbreeches' depository for cinematic masturbation.

Pervasive themes include nuns, noir, trash, art-wank, viscera, boobs, surrealism, and varying combinations thereof.

Here, we dream longingly of resurrecting the respectively pickled cadavers of Divine and Oliver Reed for a neo-noir Sapphic nun film based loosely on The Story of the Eye, made highbrow through an aspiring Bernard Herrmann soundtrack written by Goblin, and recycling the dolphin fountain pool last used for Showgirls as a chief prop.

Submissions welcome. Ask away too, but it should be noted that we're currently unable to explain why remaking The Wicker Man, I Spit On Your Grave or Sisters was ever considered, nor why Bitter Moon exists.

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