Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)

Ralph Meeker and Maxine Cooper in publicity still for Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)

Ralph Meeker and Maxine Cooper in publicity still for Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)

Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)
(via Only the Cinema)

Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)

(via Only the Cinema)

Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)
(via DVD Savant: The Restoration of Kiss Me Deadly)

Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)

(via DVD Savant: The Restoration of Kiss Me Deadly)

"Kiss me, Mike. I want you to kiss me. Kiss me. The liar’s kiss that says  I love you, and means something else."
Gaby Rodgers unmasks the “great whatzit” in Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)
(Image via Laterna Magica)

"Kiss me, Mike. I want you to kiss me. Kiss me. The liar’s kiss that says I love you, and means something else."

Gaby Rodgers unmasks the “great whatzit” in Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)

(Image via Laterna Magica)

Ralph Meeker and Maxine Cooper in Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)
(via Laterna Magica)

Ralph Meeker and Maxine Cooper in Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)

(via Laterna Magica)

Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)
(via Only the Cinema)

Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)

(via Only the Cinema)

Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)
(via Only the Cinema)

Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)

(via Only the Cinema)

Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)
"Film noir is a male fantasy, as is most of our art. Thus woman here as elsewhere is defined by her sexuality: the dark lady has access to it  and the virgin does not. […] [W]omen are defined in relation to men, and the centrality of sexuality in this definition is a key to  understanding the position of women in our culture. The primary crime the liberated woman is guilty of is refusing to be defined in such a way, and this refusal can be perversely seen (in art, or in life) as an attack on men’s very existence."
"The source and the operation of the sexual woman’s power and its danger to the male character is expressed visually both in the iconography of the image and in the visual style. The iconography is explicitly sexual, and often explicitly violent as well: long hair (blond or dark),  makeup, and jewellery. Cigarettes with their wispy trails of smoke can become cues of dark and immoral sensuality."
— Janey Place, ‘Women in Film Noir’, 1978 (in E. Ann Kaplan, Women in Film Noir)
(Image via Laterna Magica)

Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)

"Film noir is a male fantasy, as is most of our art. Thus woman here as elsewhere is defined by her sexuality: the dark lady has access to it and the virgin does not. […] [W]omen are defined in relation to men, and the centrality of sexuality in this definition is a key to understanding the position of women in our culture. The primary crime the liberated woman is guilty of is refusing to be defined in such a way, and this refusal can be perversely seen (in art, or in life) as an attack on men’s very existence."

"The source and the operation of the sexual woman’s power and its danger to the male character is expressed visually both in the iconography of the image and in the visual style. The iconography is explicitly sexual, and often explicitly violent as well: long hair (blond or dark), makeup, and jewellery. Cigarettes with their wispy trails of smoke can become cues of dark and immoral sensuality."

— Janey Place, ‘Women in Film Noir’, 1978 (in E. Ann Kaplan, Women in Film Noir)

(Image via Laterna Magica)

Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)

Ralph Meeker and Maxine Cooper in publicity still for Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)

Ralph Meeker and Maxine Cooper in publicity still for Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)

Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)
(via Only the Cinema)

Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)

(via Only the Cinema)

Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)
(via DVD Savant: The Restoration of Kiss Me Deadly)

Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)

(via DVD Savant: The Restoration of Kiss Me Deadly)

"Kiss me, Mike. I want you to kiss me. Kiss me. The liar’s kiss that says  I love you, and means something else."
Gaby Rodgers unmasks the “great whatzit” in Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)
(Image via Laterna Magica)

"Kiss me, Mike. I want you to kiss me. Kiss me. The liar’s kiss that says I love you, and means something else."

Gaby Rodgers unmasks the “great whatzit” in Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)

(Image via Laterna Magica)

Ralph Meeker and Maxine Cooper in Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)
(via Laterna Magica)

Ralph Meeker and Maxine Cooper in Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)

(via Laterna Magica)

Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)
(via Only the Cinema)

Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)

(via Only the Cinema)

Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)
(via Only the Cinema)

Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)

(via Only the Cinema)

Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)
"Film noir is a male fantasy, as is most of our art. Thus woman here as elsewhere is defined by her sexuality: the dark lady has access to it  and the virgin does not. […] [W]omen are defined in relation to men, and the centrality of sexuality in this definition is a key to  understanding the position of women in our culture. The primary crime the liberated woman is guilty of is refusing to be defined in such a way, and this refusal can be perversely seen (in art, or in life) as an attack on men’s very existence."
"The source and the operation of the sexual woman’s power and its danger to the male character is expressed visually both in the iconography of the image and in the visual style. The iconography is explicitly sexual, and often explicitly violent as well: long hair (blond or dark),  makeup, and jewellery. Cigarettes with their wispy trails of smoke can become cues of dark and immoral sensuality."
— Janey Place, ‘Women in Film Noir’, 1978 (in E. Ann Kaplan, Women in Film Noir)
(Image via Laterna Magica)

Kiss Me Deadly (Robert Aldrich, 1955)

"Film noir is a male fantasy, as is most of our art. Thus woman here as elsewhere is defined by her sexuality: the dark lady has access to it and the virgin does not. […] [W]omen are defined in relation to men, and the centrality of sexuality in this definition is a key to understanding the position of women in our culture. The primary crime the liberated woman is guilty of is refusing to be defined in such a way, and this refusal can be perversely seen (in art, or in life) as an attack on men’s very existence."

"The source and the operation of the sexual woman’s power and its danger to the male character is expressed visually both in the iconography of the image and in the visual style. The iconography is explicitly sexual, and often explicitly violent as well: long hair (blond or dark), makeup, and jewellery. Cigarettes with their wispy trails of smoke can become cues of dark and immoral sensuality."

— Janey Place, ‘Women in Film Noir’, 1978 (in E. Ann Kaplan, Women in Film Noir)

(Image via Laterna Magica)

About:

foxesinbreeches' depository for cinematic masturbation.

Pervasive themes include nuns, noir, trash, art-wank, viscera, boobs, surrealism, and varying combinations thereof.

Here, we dream longingly of resurrecting the respectively pickled cadavers of Divine and Oliver Reed for a neo-noir Sapphic nun film based loosely on The Story of the Eye, made highbrow through an aspiring Bernard Herrmann soundtrack written by Goblin, and recycling the dolphin fountain pool last used for Showgirls as a chief prop.

Submissions welcome. Ask away too, but it should be noted that we're currently unable to explain why remaking The Wicker Man, I Spit On Your Grave or Sisters was ever considered, nor why Bitter Moon exists.

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