Poster for The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)
(via visualtraining, memoriastoica)

Poster for The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)

(via visualtrainingmemoriastoica)

foxesinbreeches:

Rita Hayworth in The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)

foxesinbreeches:

Rita Hayworth in The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)

hoodoothatvoodoo, mothgirlwings:

“The Lady From Shanghai” (1947)

hoodoothatvoodoomothgirlwings:

“The Lady From Shanghai” (1947)

The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)
(via bswise)

The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)

(via bswise)

Rita Hayworth in The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)
(via bswise)
(More stills over at foxesinbreeches)
"The femme fatale is the figure of a certain discursive unease, a   potential epistemological trauma. For her most striking characteristic,   perhaps, is the fact that she is never really what she seems to be. She   harbors a threat which is not entirely legible, predictable, or   manageable. In thus transforming the threat of the woman into a secret,   something which must be aggressively revealed, unmasked, discovered,  the  figure is fully compatible with the epistemological drive of  narrative,  the hermeneutic structuration of the classical text.  Sexuality becomes  the site of questions about what can and cannot be  known. This  imbrication of knowledge and sexuality, of epistemophilia  and  scopophilia, has crucial implications for the representation of  sexual  difference in a variety of discourses - literature, philosophy,   psychoanalysis, the cinema. Both cinematic and theoretical claims to   truth about women rely to a striking extent on judgments about visions   and its stability or instability. Although her origins are literary and   pictorial, the femme fatale has a special relevance in cinematic   representation, particularly that of Hollywood insofar as it appeals to   the visible as the ground of its production of truth."
"In what does the deadliness of the femme fatale consist and why is   she so insistently a figure of fascination in texts of modernity? Her   power is of a peculiar sorrt insofar as it is usually not subject to her   conscious will, hence appearing to blur the opposition between   passivity and activity. She is an ambivalent figure because she is not   the subject of power but its carrier (the connotations of   disease are appropriate here). Indeed, if the femme fatale   overrepresents the body it is because she is attributed with a body   which is itself given agency independently of consciousness. In a sense,   she has power despite herself. The evacuation of intention   from her operations is fully consistent with the epistemological   recognition accorded to the newly born psychoanalytic concept of the   unconscious. The femme fatale is an articulation of the fears   surrounding loss of stability and centrality of the self, the “I,”, the   ego. These anxieties appear quite explicitly in the process of her   representation as castration anxiety.  […] The power accorded to the   femme fatale is a function of a fears linked to the notions of   uncontrollable drives, the fading of subjectivity, and the loss of   conscious agency - all themes of the emergent psychoanalysis. But the   femme fatale is situated as evil and is frequently punished or killed.   Her textual eradication involves a desperate reassertion of control on   the part of the threatened male subject. Hence, it would be a mistake to   see her as some kind of heroine of modernity. She is not the subject  of  feminism but a symptom of male fears about feminism. Nevertheless,  the  representation - like any representation - is not totally under the   control of its producers and, once disseminated, comes to take on a  life  of its own.”
— Mary Ann Doane, Femmes Fatales: Feminism, Film Theory, Psychoanalysis (1991)

Rita Hayworth in The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)

(via bswise)

(More stills over at foxesinbreeches)

"The femme fatale is the figure of a certain discursive unease, a potential epistemological trauma. For her most striking characteristic, perhaps, is the fact that she is never really what she seems to be. She harbors a threat which is not entirely legible, predictable, or manageable. In thus transforming the threat of the woman into a secret, something which must be aggressively revealed, unmasked, discovered, the figure is fully compatible with the epistemological drive of narrative, the hermeneutic structuration of the classical text. Sexuality becomes the site of questions about what can and cannot be known. This imbrication of knowledge and sexuality, of epistemophilia and scopophilia, has crucial implications for the representation of sexual difference in a variety of discourses - literature, philosophy, psychoanalysis, the cinema. Both cinematic and theoretical claims to truth about women rely to a striking extent on judgments about visions and its stability or instability. Although her origins are literary and pictorial, the femme fatale has a special relevance in cinematic representation, particularly that of Hollywood insofar as it appeals to the visible as the ground of its production of truth."

"In what does the deadliness of the femme fatale consist and why is she so insistently a figure of fascination in texts of modernity? Her power is of a peculiar sorrt insofar as it is usually not subject to her conscious will, hence appearing to blur the opposition between passivity and activity. She is an ambivalent figure because she is not the subject of power but its carrier (the connotations of disease are appropriate here). Indeed, if the femme fatale overrepresents the body it is because she is attributed with a body which is itself given agency independently of consciousness. In a sense, she has power despite herself. The evacuation of intention from her operations is fully consistent with the epistemological recognition accorded to the newly born psychoanalytic concept of the unconscious. The femme fatale is an articulation of the fears surrounding loss of stability and centrality of the self, the “I,”, the ego. These anxieties appear quite explicitly in the process of her representation as castration anxiety. […] The power accorded to the femme fatale is a function of a fears linked to the notions of uncontrollable drives, the fading of subjectivity, and the loss of conscious agency - all themes of the emergent psychoanalysis. But the femme fatale is situated as evil and is frequently punished or killed. Her textual eradication involves a desperate reassertion of control on the part of the threatened male subject. Hence, it would be a mistake to see her as some kind of heroine of modernity. She is not the subject of feminism but a symptom of male fears about feminism. Nevertheless, the representation - like any representation - is not totally under the control of its producers and, once disseminated, comes to take on a life of its own.”

— Mary Ann Doane, Femmes Fatales: Feminism, Film Theory, Psychoanalysis (1991)

Poster for The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)
(via visualtraining, memoriastoica)

Poster for The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)

(via visualtrainingmemoriastoica)

foxesinbreeches:

Rita Hayworth in The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)

foxesinbreeches:

Rita Hayworth in The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)

foxesinbreeches:

Rita Hayworth in The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)

foxesinbreeches:

Rita Hayworth in The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)

hoodoothatvoodoo, mothgirlwings:

“The Lady From Shanghai” (1947)

hoodoothatvoodoomothgirlwings:

“The Lady From Shanghai” (1947)

The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)
(via bswise)

The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)

(via bswise)

Rita Hayworth in The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)
(via bswise)
(More stills over at foxesinbreeches)
"The femme fatale is the figure of a certain discursive unease, a   potential epistemological trauma. For her most striking characteristic,   perhaps, is the fact that she is never really what she seems to be. She   harbors a threat which is not entirely legible, predictable, or   manageable. In thus transforming the threat of the woman into a secret,   something which must be aggressively revealed, unmasked, discovered,  the  figure is fully compatible with the epistemological drive of  narrative,  the hermeneutic structuration of the classical text.  Sexuality becomes  the site of questions about what can and cannot be  known. This  imbrication of knowledge and sexuality, of epistemophilia  and  scopophilia, has crucial implications for the representation of  sexual  difference in a variety of discourses - literature, philosophy,   psychoanalysis, the cinema. Both cinematic and theoretical claims to   truth about women rely to a striking extent on judgments about visions   and its stability or instability. Although her origins are literary and   pictorial, the femme fatale has a special relevance in cinematic   representation, particularly that of Hollywood insofar as it appeals to   the visible as the ground of its production of truth."
"In what does the deadliness of the femme fatale consist and why is   she so insistently a figure of fascination in texts of modernity? Her   power is of a peculiar sorrt insofar as it is usually not subject to her   conscious will, hence appearing to blur the opposition between   passivity and activity. She is an ambivalent figure because she is not   the subject of power but its carrier (the connotations of   disease are appropriate here). Indeed, if the femme fatale   overrepresents the body it is because she is attributed with a body   which is itself given agency independently of consciousness. In a sense,   she has power despite herself. The evacuation of intention   from her operations is fully consistent with the epistemological   recognition accorded to the newly born psychoanalytic concept of the   unconscious. The femme fatale is an articulation of the fears   surrounding loss of stability and centrality of the self, the “I,”, the   ego. These anxieties appear quite explicitly in the process of her   representation as castration anxiety.  […] The power accorded to the   femme fatale is a function of a fears linked to the notions of   uncontrollable drives, the fading of subjectivity, and the loss of   conscious agency - all themes of the emergent psychoanalysis. But the   femme fatale is situated as evil and is frequently punished or killed.   Her textual eradication involves a desperate reassertion of control on   the part of the threatened male subject. Hence, it would be a mistake to   see her as some kind of heroine of modernity. She is not the subject  of  feminism but a symptom of male fears about feminism. Nevertheless,  the  representation - like any representation - is not totally under the   control of its producers and, once disseminated, comes to take on a  life  of its own.”
— Mary Ann Doane, Femmes Fatales: Feminism, Film Theory, Psychoanalysis (1991)

Rita Hayworth in The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)

(via bswise)

(More stills over at foxesinbreeches)

"The femme fatale is the figure of a certain discursive unease, a potential epistemological trauma. For her most striking characteristic, perhaps, is the fact that she is never really what she seems to be. She harbors a threat which is not entirely legible, predictable, or manageable. In thus transforming the threat of the woman into a secret, something which must be aggressively revealed, unmasked, discovered, the figure is fully compatible with the epistemological drive of narrative, the hermeneutic structuration of the classical text. Sexuality becomes the site of questions about what can and cannot be known. This imbrication of knowledge and sexuality, of epistemophilia and scopophilia, has crucial implications for the representation of sexual difference in a variety of discourses - literature, philosophy, psychoanalysis, the cinema. Both cinematic and theoretical claims to truth about women rely to a striking extent on judgments about visions and its stability or instability. Although her origins are literary and pictorial, the femme fatale has a special relevance in cinematic representation, particularly that of Hollywood insofar as it appeals to the visible as the ground of its production of truth."

"In what does the deadliness of the femme fatale consist and why is she so insistently a figure of fascination in texts of modernity? Her power is of a peculiar sorrt insofar as it is usually not subject to her conscious will, hence appearing to blur the opposition between passivity and activity. She is an ambivalent figure because she is not the subject of power but its carrier (the connotations of disease are appropriate here). Indeed, if the femme fatale overrepresents the body it is because she is attributed with a body which is itself given agency independently of consciousness. In a sense, she has power despite herself. The evacuation of intention from her operations is fully consistent with the epistemological recognition accorded to the newly born psychoanalytic concept of the unconscious. The femme fatale is an articulation of the fears surrounding loss of stability and centrality of the self, the “I,”, the ego. These anxieties appear quite explicitly in the process of her representation as castration anxiety. […] The power accorded to the femme fatale is a function of a fears linked to the notions of uncontrollable drives, the fading of subjectivity, and the loss of conscious agency - all themes of the emergent psychoanalysis. But the femme fatale is situated as evil and is frequently punished or killed. Her textual eradication involves a desperate reassertion of control on the part of the threatened male subject. Hence, it would be a mistake to see her as some kind of heroine of modernity. She is not the subject of feminism but a symptom of male fears about feminism. Nevertheless, the representation - like any representation - is not totally under the control of its producers and, once disseminated, comes to take on a life of its own.”

— Mary Ann Doane, Femmes Fatales: Feminism, Film Theory, Psychoanalysis (1991)

About:

foxesinbreeches' depository for cinematic masturbation.

Pervasive themes include nuns, noir, trash, art-wank, viscera, boobs, surrealism, and varying combinations thereof.

Here, we dream longingly of resurrecting the respectively pickled cadavers of Divine and Oliver Reed for a neo-noir Sapphic nun film based loosely on The Story of the Eye, made highbrow through an aspiring Bernard Herrmann soundtrack written by Goblin, and recycling the dolphin fountain pool last used for Showgirls as a chief prop.

Submissions welcome. Ask away too, but it should be noted that we're currently unable to explain why remaking The Wicker Man, I Spit On Your Grave or Sisters was ever considered, nor why Bitter Moon exists.

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